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Peregrine Falcon
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Peregrine Falcon
[Falco peregrinus]

[Length 16 (Male) to 20 (Female) in. Wingspan 36 (M) to 44 (F) in.]

This Peregrine Falcon was photographed at Boca Chica Beach, Brownsville, Texas, USA. Photo taken with a AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED lens on a Nikon D7100 camera. (Date: March 18, 2014)


(use image name "falcon_peregrine-1025" for inquiries)

Peregrine Falcon
click on the photo
for a larger view
Peregrine Falcon
[Falco peregrinus]

[Length 16 (Male) to 20 (Female) in. Wingspan 36 (M) to 44 (F) in.]

Peregrine Falcons are easily recognized in flight by their large size, long and pointed wings, and "Elvis Presley" sideburns. They are considered to be the fastest animal on earth, reaching speeds of well over 100 miles per hour when they dive or "stoop" on the smaller birds which are their prey. They are almost always found near cliffs (on which they nest) either along coastal areas or near wetlands of some kind. Peregrine Falcons suffered heavy losses in eastern North America during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s due to pesticides (primarily DDT), which caused eggs with thin shells to be laid. Indeed, a sighting of a Peregrine during those times would warrant an entry on the local rare bird alert. Western and Alaskan populations were generally unaffected by this. The eastern populations are recovering due to the ban of harmful pesticides, and captive breeding and reintroduction programs sponsored by organizations such as Cornell University. Today, it is possible to see as many as 50 of these magnificent birds of prey in a day at hawk watch migration points such as Cape May, New Jersey. This immature was photographed flying overhead during fall migration at Cape May, New Jersey, USA. Photo taken with a Nikkor 300mm ED f4.5 lens on Kodachrome 200 film. (Date: September 1988)


(use image name "falcop" for inquiries)

Peregrine Falcon
click on the photo
for a larger view
Peregrine Falcon
[Falco peregrinus]

[Length 16 (Male) to 20 (Female) in. Wingspan 36 (M) to 44 (F) in.]

Peregrine Falcons are easily recognized in flight by their large size, long and pointed wings, and "Elvis Presley" sideburns. They are considered to be the fastest animal on earth, reaching speeds of well over 100 miles per hour when they dive or "stoop" on the smaller birds which are their prey. They are almost always found near cliffs (on which they nest) either along coastal areas or near wetlands of some kind. Peregrine Falcons suffered heavy losses in eastern North America during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s due to pesticides (primarily DDT), which caused eggs with thin shells to be laid. Indeed, a sighting of a Peregrine during those times would warrant an entry on the local rare bird alert. Western and Alaskan populations were generally unaffected by this. The eastern populations are recovering due to the ban of harmful pesticides, and captive breeding and reintroduction programs sponsored by organizations such as Cornell University. Today, it is possible to see as many as 50 of these magnificent birds of prey in a day at hawk watch migration points such as Cape May, New Jersey. This Peregrine Falcon was photographed at an industrial site in Bayonne, New Jersey, USA. Photo taken with a Celestron 1250mm f10 mirror lens on Ektachrome 200 film. (Date: February 1985)


(use image name "falcp2" for inquiries)

Prairie Falcon
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Prairie Falcon
[Falco mexicanus]

[Length 15.5 (Male) to 19.5 (Female) in. Wingspan 35 (M) to 43 (F) in.]

This Prairie Falcon was photographed at Midland, Texas, USA. Photo taken with a AF-S VR Nikkor 300mm f/2.8G IF-ED lens + Nikkor TC20E II 2.0x Teleconverter (EFL=900mm) on a Nikon D300 camera. (Date: January 3, 2010)


(use image name "falcon_prairie-1001" for inquiries)

Northern Goshawk
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Northern Goshawk
[Accipiter gentilis]

[Length 21 (Male) to 26 (Female) in. Wingspan 40 (M) to 46 (F) in.]

This Northern Goshawk was photographed at Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, Colorado, USA. Photo taken with a AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED lens (EFL=450mm) on a Nikon D200 camera. (Date: April 22, 2009)


(use image name "goshawk_northern-1002" for inquiries)

Northern Goshawk
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Northern Goshawk
[Accipiter gentilis]

[Length 21 (Male) to 26 (Female) in. Wingspan 40 (M) to 46 (F) in.]

This Northern Goshawk was photographed on a nest in Garden Canyon at Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, Arizona, USA. Photo taken with a Nikkor 300mm ED f4.5 lens on Ektachrome 200 film. (Date: May 1985)


(use image name "goshn" for inquiries)

Gyrfalcon
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Gyrfalcon
[Falco rusticolus]

[Length 20 (Male) to 25 (Female) in. Wingspan 50 (M) to 64 (F) in.]

This captive "White Phase" Gyrfalcon was photographed at the Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival, Harlingen, Texas, USA. Photo taken with a AF-S DX VR Zoom-Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED [II] lens on a Nikon D3200 camera. (Date: November 8, 2014)


(use image name "gyrfalcon-1001" for inquiries)

Gyrfalcon
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Gyrfalcon
[Falco rusticolus]

[Length 20 (Male) to 25 (Female) in. Wingspan 50 (M) to 64 (F) in.]

This immature Gyrfalcon was photographed as a winter visitor (January-February 2002) in Lubbock, Texas, USA. This is the southernmost record of Gyrfalcon in the United States. Photo taken with a Nikkor 300mm EDAF f4 lens on Kodachrome 200 film. (Date: February 2002)


(use image name "falcgyr1" for inquiries)

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Last Updated: Friday December 11, 2020 - 21:49:16 CST